Security
Not Your Basic Baby Monitor
High-tech baby monitor protects against SIDS
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June 18, 2012 by Lisa Montgomery

We’ve seen monitoring system that stream video from a surveillance camera aimed at baby’s crib to TV screens throughout the house. Some of the cameras even incorporate audio so parents can hear their child. The monitoring of movement is another way to ensure the well-being of a baby.

For a few years Snuza has offered a device that clips to a child’s diaper near the stomach to gauge movement as a way to protect the child against SIDS. If the Halo Movement Monitor does not sense movement within 15 seconds it activates a pulsing vibration, which imitates a technique used by hospital neonatal care units called “cutaneous stimulation.” If that doesn’t work, an audible alarm is triggered.

The entire process happens automatically, so to provide parents with a visual of baby’s slumber for greater peace of mind, Snuza now bundles its Halo monitor with a night vision camera with a built-in microphone to capture sounds of the baby and the Halo alarm should it go off. A companion monitor with a 2.3-inch LCD screen can pick up the image form the camera wirelessly up to 450 feet away. The camera can also help put baby to sleep by playing one of three pre-recorded lullabies.
The http://www.snuza.info” title=“Snuza”>Snuza Trio sells for $299.99.

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Lisa Montgomery - Contributing Writer
Lisa Montgomery has been writing about home technology for 15 years, with a focus on the impact of electronics on a modern lifestyle.

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