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Theater’s 3,300 DVDs Ready at Touch of a Button
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May 08, 2009 | by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
A massive DVD collection digitally stored on a Kaleidescape system is brought to the big screen in this blockbuster room.
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Posted by The Pinball Blog  on  05/08  at  08:27 AM

Very cool!

But what about the important stuff…

What pinball machines does he have?

:)

Posted by Justin  on  05/09  at  09:02 AM

I kinda don’t believe the “106-by-45-foot theater screen” part.” Joking aside, it is sad how “little/minimal” a theater he owns after spending so much. Worse, he had to load all of the films himself! Maybe he wanted to, but if the ceiling here is $250K, I’d expect someone from the installer/builder to do it to my specifications for the money. Worse still, he spend this much and only has two subs? Four is better integration for bass, as many will argue. Perhaps it was impossible due to room structure constraints. Just not a lot for the money here.

Posted by Tom  on  05/11  at  03:35 PM

How did he get those DVDs ripped legally to the server?  According to Real.com, RealDVD is still in limbo because of legality issues in copying DVDs to other devices.

Posted by John  on  05/11  at  05:58 PM

Who mentioned anything about him ripping them legally?

Posted by MacAttack  on  05/11  at  06:20 PM

I just don’t get how the owner can enjoy such a large screen without having a Blu-Ray player. All that coin spent on the huge screen and to not have HD Media is a waste. Simple as that.

Posted by Bill  on  05/11  at  11:31 PM

Despite that Kaleidescape is pure piracy I laugh at the amount of money spent on this system and he is still running a Lexicon MV-5, I guess sound and video are not a priority since we see no blu ray or lossless audio.

Posted by En Sabur Nur  on  05/12  at  06:55 AM

I doubt that the owner cares. He has what he wants.

Posted by Todd A  on  05/12  at  01:15 PM

I don’t know much about Kaleidescape, maybe ripping DVDs is legal…...it’s copying them that is ilegal.

To Bill: What lossless brings to the sound quality equation ain’t much. Check out this link: http://www.hemagazine.com/node/Dolby_TrueHD_DTS-MA_versus_Uncompressed_PCM

Posted by Paul  on  05/12  at  04:50 PM

Kalidescape already won the lawsuit that Real is currently persuing.  Real is even using the same tactics that Kalidescape used.  The basic arguement is that since Real pays to licence CSS, they are legally entitled to break the CSS encryption on a DVD.  While hardly a legal expert, I think the main reason that Kalidescape won, and Real is tied up in litigation is the difference between their products.  A entry level Kalidescape server is close to $30,000, and RealDVD is what $100?

The MPAA could have appealled the Kalidescape victory, but as long as Kalidescape stays high end the $ amount the MPAA is loosing is peanuts.

With Real’s $300 Facet player (basically a $300 Kalidescape system running ReadDVD), the MPAA is crapping their shorts thinking about the potential lost revenue.

Real lost close to $6M last year fighting this legal battle.  If they can’t win soon, or unless someone like Microsoft or Google bankrolls the court case, chances are RealDVD and the Facet player will never see the light of day.

Posted by Bill  on  05/12  at  05:57 PM

Kalidescape is “legal” simply becuase of the amount of money that it costs and the connections within the company. Kalidescape offers no advantage over a basic HTPC and the price is outrageous for what you get. Its also funny how people will comment that lossless audio does not add much, when did the high end become complacent with hardware/software that is “good” enough, its sounds like theta digital owners. The high end can not compete anymore and you pay only for the name.

Posted by Julie Jacobson  on  05/13  at  08:04 AM

Kaleidescape’s win had to do with a murky contractual agreement with DVD CCA. The court said a certain clause in the DVD CCA license was NOT part of the original agreement.

The Real battle concerns the digital millennium copyright act. That battle has not come to court before. Kscape doesn’t really set a precedent because the DVD CCA can (and has) simply change their licensing agreement.

The DMCA fight (Real) should settle things once and for all, and I pray that Real wins.

For the latest on dvd ripping legalities, visit http://www.cepro.com/dvdripleg

Posted by Todd A  on  05/13  at  01:30 PM

Bill, did you bother to copy and paste the link I provided?If you had read it, you would have seen that while one system was what would be considered high-end, the other was very modest. After reading your post it appears as though YOU are the one championing the high-end game. My point was that high bit rate lossy audio such as the standard DD and dts you find on Blu-Ray, is for the most part indistingushable from the lossless codecs. DD TrueHD and dts MA. This is a fact, whether or not you can get past your subjective analysis is another thing all together.

Posted by Lizzie A.  on  05/13  at  05:27 PM

Get your facts straight.  The MPAA could NOT have appealed the Kaleidescape ruling because it is not even a party in that case.  That’s purely a contract dispute case between the DVD copy protection licensing group (DVD CCA,which is not the MPAA) and Kaleidescape, and DVD CCA has in fact appealed the Kaleidescape ruling.  DVD CCA is ONE of the parties to the current RealDVD case and has brought contract claims again.  However, the MPAA has brought a totally different claim against Real for circumvention in violation of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.  Kaleidescape simply has no bearing on that claim.

Posted by David  on  05/13  at  05:33 PM

For all of the misinformed people on this website. First of, Kaleidescape does not “rip” DVDs, it creates a bit for bit copy of the disc that is stored digitally. There is an EULA involved in owning a system, the purchaser must sign documentation that states they must own the media that is being played and have a copy of the media on hand in order to legally use the equipment. For anyone who has not used a Kaleidescape there is an enormous difference between a HTPC and a Kaledeiscape, it is something that you have to experience. An entry level Kaleidescape that can hold about 75 movies cost less than 10K. Comparing a Kaleidescape to a HTPC is like comparing a supped up Mustang to a Ferrari!

Posted by Bill  on  05/13  at  06:37 PM

“My point was that high bit rate lossy audio such as the standard DD and dts you find on Blu-Ray, is for the most part indistingushable from the lossless codecs. DD TrueHD and dts MA. This is a fact, whether or not you can get past your subjective analysis is another thing all together.”

Fact? How so? It was ONE test done by a couple people.

“For all of the misinformed people on this website. First of, Kaleidescape does not “rip” DVDs, it creates a bit for bit copy of the disc that is stored digitally. There is an EULA involved in owning a system, the purchaser must sign documentation that states they must own the media that is being played and have a copy of the media on hand in order to legally use the equipment. For anyone who has not used a Kaleidescape there is an enormous difference between a HTPC and a Kaledeiscape, it is something that you have to experience. An entry level Kaleidescape that can hold about 75 movies cost less than 10K. Comparing a Kaleidescape to a HTPC is like comparing a supped up Mustang to a Ferrari!”

Please, digital is digital and Kaledeiscape does nothing different from a HTPC other then cost more. You think Kaledeiscape is better simply based on the amount of money it costs, this is very typical of high end owners. Kaledeiscape has no protection against someone renting movies and ripping them to their system and Kaledeiscape has no way of telling if the copy is rented or owned, read their FAQ.

Posted by David  on  05/13  at  06:46 PM

I am well informed of the policy, I am a Kaleidescape dealer! I know that they have no idea if you actually own the media, but the responsibility is outta their hands since the end user signs an agreement. I also realize that digital information is all the same. My point has more to do with the user interface, experience and reliability. The way you access your movies and browse your library with a Kaleidescape far exceeds that of a HTPC. Also it is almost impossible for a Kaleidescape system to fail, sure hard drives go bad, but data is almost never lost and to top it off before a hard drive even goes bad Kaleidescape knows about it and sends out a replacement!

Posted by Paul  on  05/14  at  10:14 AM

@ David: so… what your saying is the Kalidescape system uses a RAID 5 array, just like an HTPC user could do (but probably wouldn’t because of the cost of 4 or more hard drives). Any RAID software would let you know the drive is failing, which is hardly unique to Kalidescape.

The technology you are describing is available to anyone building a computer, and the Kalidescape interface, while top notch, is hardly revolutionary.  Any number of HTPC programs out there perform similarly to the Kalidescape system.  Internet updates and databases are easy enough to set up, and there are a bunch of free movie databases with cover art, synopsis, and all sorts of other information out there.

Even with all that being said, I’d love a kalidescape system, as it puts it all into one convienient but very pricy package.  Products like RealDVD allow me to get something closer without spending $30k.  Sure it’s not kalidescape, but I’m not out the $30-50k it would cost me to store my entire DVD library either.

Finally as one of the few people who bought a copy of RealDVD before the cease and desist order, REAL has a similar EULA regarding the whole rental/netflix thing, just like Kalidescape does, and it’s just as easy to ignore.  Real copies the DVD bit for bit just like Kalidescape does, and wraps it in another layer of encryption, just like Kalidescape as well.

Posted by David  on  05/14  at  10:33 AM

Paul-
I understand your conviction about you beliefs that a HTPC is equivalent. For the record, I do understand RAID arrays and I also understand the RAID array that Kaleidescape uses. It is not RAID 5, Kaleidescape uses their own technology and has created their own unique RAID array. You have to remember these are the same people that invented NAS. I am not downplaying how nice a HTPC is and the usefulness, when it works. I have looked into a HTPC for myself and I am personally looking forward to Real winning their case so I can easily manage a DVD library on my laptop for travel purposes, I however do not believe that Real will win the case, because where as Kaleidescape can protect the media from ever being distributed all over the internet once it is on the server, Real cannot.

Posted by Todd A  on  05/14  at  10:51 AM

Bill, Bill, Bill. Yes it was one test, but it was one test done by the people who invented the codecs. Are you having difficulty understanding this? I know what it is, you have to justify the money you spent on a AVR or pre/pro that accepts audio off HDMI.

As far as your “rip” comment, even if a bit for bit copy is transferred to a hard drive, ripping still takes place. For example, even when you transfer a CD to your hard drive, even in a lossless format such as WAV, it is still being ripped by a program. You need to get past this concept. Furthermore, what the heck difference would it make? If bits are bits, which they are, the packaging, ie: compression is whats important.

Posted by Paul  on  05/14  at  11:29 AM

I think you’re mistaken David.  I read through the 36 page counter claim that Real posted yesterday, and their software does indeed prevent copying or transfers across a network once the protected content has been copies onto the hard drive.  Real uses the AES encryption scheme on the original ‘package’ which according to the filing is “...a quintillion times more secure than CCS encryption.  It is the encryption used by the US government for classified information.”

If you’re curious as to the rest of the protection measures Real has implimented, they are summarized on section C, pages 19-20 lines 11-28, 1-5.  The link is is the new Real article that EH posted this morning.

Like I said in my earlier post, I believe that Kalidescape is the superior product, but commands a superior price.  I believe that Real has a comperable product for a fraction of the price.  I take exception to minimizing the Real product because it’s not $10k.

@ Todd and Bill:  ‘Ripping’ is commonly used terminology to describe the act of copying material from a physical disc to a hard drive. While lawyers and marketing people may take exception to the term, most people use it to describe the copying process, whether ‘legally’ done or not.  Until a court decides what the official term is for ‘bit for bit legal’ copy the terms will be interchangeable regardless of what we think.

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